Risks to pest management in New Zealands pipfruit Integrated Fruit Production programme

Authors

  • P.L. Lo
  • J.T.S. Walker
  • D.J. Rogers

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.30843/nzpp.2015.68.5827

Abstract

Pest management in New Zealands pipfruit Integrated Fruit Production (IFP) programme relies on selective pesticides biological control and pheromone mating disruption The current situation is potentially precarious and one concern the impact of less selective pesticides was tested Apple trees received synthetic pyrethroid (deltamethrin) sprays during the first half of two growing seasons Beneficial and pest species were monitored monthly from November to April Treated trees had fewer predatory bugs (91 100 reduction) lacewings (64100) earwigs (80100) predatory mites (67100) spiders (2064) and Hymenoptera (1649) than untreated trees Ladybird numbers varied depending on the assessment method Outbreaks of phytophagous mites and woolly scale and Froggatts apple leafhopper on untreated trees Factors that make pest management under IFP vulnerable in the future include a loss of biological control and the consequences of new pests establishing

Published

2015-01-08

How to Cite

Lo, P., Walker, J., & Rogers, D. (2015). Risks to pest management in New Zealands pipfruit Integrated Fruit Production programme. New Zealand Plant Protection, 68, 306-312. https://doi.org/10.30843/nzpp.2015.68.5827

Issue

Section

Insects & diseases in apples & kiwifruit

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