Using novel-grass endophyte associations as an avian deterrent

  • C.G.L. Pennell AgResearch Ltd., Lincoln Research Centre, Private Bag 4749, Christchurch 8140, New Zealand
  • M.P. Rolston AgResearch Ltd., Lincoln Research Centre, Private Bag 4749, Christchurch 8140, New Zealand; The Foundation for Arable Research, PO Box 23133, Templeton, Christchurch 8445, New Zealand
  • D. Baird VSN (NZ) Ltd., 8 Mariposa Crescent, Aidan eld, Christchurch 8025, New Zealand
  • D.E. Hume AgResearch Ltd., Grasslands Research Centre, Private Bag 11008, Palmerston North 4442, New Zealand
  • C.M. McKenzie AgResearch Ltd., Grasslands Research Centre, Private Bag 11008, Palmerston North 4442, New Zealand
  • S.D. Card AgResearch Ltd., Grasslands Research Centre, Private Bag 11008, Palmerston North 4442, New Zealand

Abstract

Birds can be major pests in agricultural and horticultural crops as well as being serious hazards to operating aircraft. Cultivars of perennial ryegrass, a hybrid ryegrass and tall fescue, associated with selected Epichloë fungal endophytes were evaluated in aviary and field experiments for their management potential of three nuisance bird species selected as model systems representative of major bird classifications based on their diet. Granivores, namely European green finches, ate more endophyte-free perennial ryegrass seed than endophyte- infected seed, while the representative omnivores, black-backed gulls, avoided endophyte- enhanced feed pellets. The selected herbivore, Canada geese, showed an aversion to field trial plots sown with endophyte-infected grass containing ergovaline compared with the existing ground cover. Therefore habitat modification using selected grass-endophyte associations offers an effective wildlife management option aimed at reducing birds in problematic areas.

Published
2017-07-25
How to Cite
PENNELL, C.G.L. et al. Using novel-grass endophyte associations as an avian deterrent. New Zealand Plant Protection, [S.l.], v. 70, p. 255-264, july 2017. ISSN 1179-352X. Available at: <http://journal.nzpps.org/index.php/nzpp/article/view/59>. Date accessed: 22 sep. 2017.
Section
Pasture Pests

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