The effect of fungicides on spore germination, mycelial growth and lesion development of <i>Phlyctema vagabunda</i> (syn: <i>Neofabraea alba</i>) (bull’s eye rot of apples)

  • P.N. Wood The New Zealand Institute for Plant & Food Research Limited, Havelock North Research Centre, Private Bag 1401, Havelock North, New Zealand
  • B.M. Fisher The New Zealand Institute for Plant & Food Research Limited, Havelock North Research Centre, Private Bag 1401, Havelock North, New Zealand
Keywords: Phlyctema vagabunda, bull’s eye rot, efficacy, conidia, in vitro, ‘Sciros’/Pacific RoseTM

Abstract

Phlyctema vagabunda (syn: Neofabraea alba) is a plant pathogenic fungus that causes bull’s eye rot on apples and pears. Phlyctema vagabunda fruit infections occur in orchards predominantly pre-harvest, and eventually express as a fruit rot after 4–5 months of cool storage. Twelve fungicides (captan, carbendazim, copper hydroxide, cyprodinil, difenoconazole, dithianon, dodine, isopyrazam, metiram, lime sulphur, sulphur and trifloxystrobin) were tested in vitro for their effects on spore germination and mycelial growth of P. vagabunda. Spore germination was inhibited by metiram, captan, dodine, dithianon, lime sulphur, carbendazim and isopyrazam, in order of effectiveness. Carbendazim, isopyrazam, difenoconazole and cyprodinil, in order of effectiveness, inhibited mycelial growth when used at label rates. Wettable sulphur was ineffective in both assays. On detached apple fruit, carbendazim, cyprodinil, trifloxystrobin and isopyrazam (in order of effectiveness) inhibited lesion development.

Published
2017-08-08
How to Cite
Wood, P., & Fisher, B. (2017). The effect of fungicides on spore germination, mycelial growth and lesion development of <i>Phlyctema vagabunda</i> (syn: <i>Neofabraea alba</i&gt;) (bull’s eye rot of apples). New Zealand Plant Protection, 70, 112-119. https://doi.org/https://doi.org/10.30843/nzpp.2017.70.36
Section
Vol 70 Apple Pathology 2017